Monday, November 19th, 2012 .

Nominations are open for the Crunchies, TechCrunch’s annual competition and award ceremony to recognize and celebrate the most compelling startups of the year.  This year there’s a new category on the list, Sexiest Enterprise Startup. We’re in it to win it on this one, but we need your help to get there. If you think we’re sexy and you know it, please take a moment to head on over to the Crunchies nominationspage and vote for us for Sexiest Enterprise Startup 2012!

Why vote for us:
Enterprise software doesn’t need to be ugly and clunky.  At ÜberConference, good design and ease of use has been a central part of our philosophy, and it has paid off.  Before our launch, little had changed in audio conferencing in years…people would carry around cards with long PIN numbers and struggle through rounds of “Who just joined?” and “Who said that?” during calls.

ÜberConference’s social caller ID and unique visual interface changes all of that.  Everyone invited to an UberConference call can dial in without PINs, see who’s on the call and who’s talking, and learn more about others on the call.  Plus, call organizers can run meetings smoothly with a full set of features you can just click to use.

ÜberConference is free to try and businesses and enterprises of all sizes can sign up for and manage multiple accounts as easily as managing email through a simple online tool. You can even use it right from Gmail if your company uses Google Apps.

How sexy is that?

Help support the cause by heading over to the Crunchies nominations. Every vote counts.  You can vote multiple times (once a day), so please vote today and keep voting!

Vote now!

Monday, February 4th, 2013 .

It was great being at ITEXPO last week. We met a lot of interesting people at the event and had a great time!

ÜberConference was proud to be a sponsor of StartUpCamp7, a great event for early-stage communications companies to showcase cutting-edge technologies and business ideas. Our CEO, Craig Walker, was one of the judges. He was also part of the panel, The Future of Service Providers – Dumb Pipes or Global Leaders. Here are some pics from the event.

If you were at the event you would have also seen that ÜberConference was sponsoring the front and back of the badges at the event. For those who weren’t there, here is how it looked:

Thursday, June 13th, 2013 .

My first job was working as a sales manager at computer giant CDW, a large computer company in Chicago, where I chatted on the phone all day with I.T. directors and helpdesk managers.

Most of my clients were I.T. guys who worked at the helpdesk and were responsible for keeping the company’s technology infrastructure up and running.

When tech support issues are straightforward, I.T. professionals resolve them with a quick phone call, instant message, or email to the customer.

When tech support issues cannot be resolved immediately, the standard protocol is to log the issue as a ticket in a helpdesk ticket tracking system like Mojo Helpdesk. From there, the ticket is assigned to an expert, or team of experts, who can most efficiently resolve the issue.

Sometimes you’ll have up to 3-4  employees getting involved to solve a support ticket. This is where the combination of a ticket tracking system like Mojo and a conference calling system like UberConference can start to aid internal efficiency.

Instead of flooding a support ticket with ton of comments and creating a confusing ticket thread that’s hard to follow, the support staff can hold a conference call to resolve the customer issue, using the helpdesk ticket as a reference during the discussion.

Very frequently, support staff can accomplish more in a 5-minute conference call than they can by exchanging 20+ emails.

Even if the conference call doesn’t fully resolve the issue, support staff can record the call, and make note of outstanding follow ups.

Those follow-ups can be added as tickets in Mojo and then assigned to the appropriate topic experts, and tracked to completion (i.e. the answer is sent to the customer). Once the ticket is solved, Mojo saves it automatically for future reference in case another customer has a similar issue.

Thursday, November 29th, 2012 .

How to Get Your Whole Company Hooked on Social with Michael Brito

SVP of Social Business for Edelman, Michael Brito, is a social media rockstar with over 30k Twitter followers and a book currently out on Amazon Smart Business Social Business. He’s one of the main forces behind social for companies like Hewlett Packard and Intel, and one of the foremost experts in the country when it comes to B2B social media marketing. Host of our Ubercast, Sarah Buhr, sat down to chat with Michael at the Edelman offices in downtown San Francisco about some key ways to get everyone you work with on board with the social program.

Tips:

  • Get engineers and others in the company involved. Ask them to write a blog post and actively talk about their expertise.
  • Create a social media employee guide to help those in the company understand messaging and social media etiquette
  • Encourage employees to actively tweet out and post company messaging on their own social channels.

Links mentioned in the podcast:

Amazon

Hewlett Packard

Intel

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014 .

“Man is by nature a social animal; an individual who is unsocial naturally and not accidentally is either beneath our notice or more than human. Society is something that precedes the individual. Anyone who either cannot lead the common life or is so self-sufficient as not to need to, and therefore does not partake of society, is either a beast or a god. ” –Aristotle, “The Politics”

When you sit down and think about it, many of the greatest accomplishments of the human race are collaborative efforts. The cathedrals of medieval France. MGM musicals like “Singing in the Rain” or “Royal Wedding”. Democracy. The Renaissance. A double double cheeseburger with fries from In ‘N Out Burger.

These are things that could only have been created by a group effort – human beings working together.

Why?  Because we are, as Aristotle observed more than 2,300 years ago, social animals. We live a common life together.

So if we live a common life together and are, at heart, social animals; why do so many teleconferences not work? What, exactly, causes them to be disappointing? I think I can confidently state that it is not because we are either beasts nor gods.

What causes many teleconferences to fail is a combination of inefficient technology and basic human politeness. These are what I call “the pain points of teleconferencing.” And they are solvable problems.

1. Set an agenda. Stick to it.

Unless the teleconference is between NFL owners, nobody gets to talk about the Super Bowl.

Before your next teleconference, send out an agenda to everyone. These are the items we will be discussing, and this is the order in which we’ll be discussing them. People are busy, and while your teleconference may in fact be the most important part of their work day, it is not the only part of their work day. Nothing kills a teleconference quicker than desultory talk about the weather, the latest flu outbreak or last night’s episode of Grey’s Anatomy. We all have other things to do today besides chit-chat right now. Stay on point, stick to the agenda, finish the call.

2. People are going to arrive late. Deal with it.

It’s just going to happen: people are going to show up late. They’ll have a million good reasons. We don’t need to hear them. We also don’t need to recap what’s been discussed already.

Think of it this way: somebody shows up late to Mass. The priest doesn’t stop the proceedings, introduce everyone, and then recap what’s happened so far. No. If you show up late, you check where in the liturgy (agenda) we are, listen in and catch up on your own.

There’s no reason a teleconference can’t operate that way either.

3. Use technology that works.

Teleconferencing technology should do the following:

— allow automatic sharing of documents during the call

— visual identification of who is speaking and participating

— late entrants can join without interrupting — or stopping — the call

If your teleconferencing system can’t do these things, your calls are going to be less effective, more painful for the callers, and, ultimately less collaborative.

We’re human beings. We’re social animals. We’re working on a problem together. Any technology you are using that disrupts collaborative work is anti-social and goes counter to who we are in our essence.