Wednesday, November 13th, 2013 .

Big things are happening at UberConference! We’ve just opened an office in downtown Raleigh, North Carolina, and we’re growing quickly.

The office is located two blocks from the Raleigh State Capital in the historic Briggs Hardware Building, and is led by Raleigh GM and UberConference Head of Telephony, TR Missner.

We expect to add up to 20 more North Carolina members to our team over the next few months-including operations, sales and customer service representatives.

“Raleigh is a thriving, dynamic market with an extraordinary talent pool,” said T.R. “Establishment of our office in Raleigh makes it possible for us to provide exceptional customer service with extended hours, and expand brand awareness and product knowledge through East Coast sales channels.”

He added, “It’s another step in our strategy to provide the best conference calling service in the world.”


Interested in joining our team?

Send a message to

Tuesday, December 10th, 2013 .

We’re excited to announce a totally redesigned UberConference! Our new interface makes conference calls even easier. Best of all, absolutely no PINs are required for Pro users and their guests.

  • No PINs: For Pro accounts, now there’s no PIN required for anyone in your meeting. For Basic (free) accounts, the meeting organizer dialing-in from their own phone still doesn’t need a PIN.
  • Better security: As always, our visual interface lets you be sure who is and isn’t on your call. No need to worry if someone is still there from your last call or ask “who just joined?” Now you can “lock” and unlock calls whenever you want to prevent others from joining. Simply click the lock icon, or press ## on your phone to lock and unlock.
  • Free New interface: It’s even easier to schedule and host instant calls. Your online conference room is now totally redesigned with many usability improvements.
  • Free call recordings: With this update, even Basic account holders are able to record and share meeting recordings.
  • Mobile apps: Experience our new fully featured Android app(iPhone coming soon). Now easily schedule future conferences in addition to instant conferences while you’re on the go.

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014 .

“Man is by nature a social animal; an individual who is unsocial naturally and not accidentally is either beneath our notice or more than human. Society is something that precedes the individual. Anyone who either cannot lead the common life or is so self-sufficient as not to need to, and therefore does not partake of society, is either a beast or a god. ” –Aristotle, “The Politics”

When you sit down and think about it, many of the greatest accomplishments of the human race are collaborative efforts. The cathedrals of medieval France. MGM musicals like “Singing in the Rain” or “Royal Wedding”. Democracy. The Renaissance. A double double cheeseburger with fries from In ‘N Out Burger.

These are things that could only have been created by a group effort – human beings working together.

Why?  Because we are, as Aristotle observed more than 2,300 years ago, social animals. We live a common life together.

So if we live a common life together and are, at heart, social animals; why do so many teleconferences not work? What, exactly, causes them to be disappointing? I think I can confidently state that it is not because we are either beasts nor gods.

What causes many teleconferences to fail is a combination of inefficient technology and basic human politeness. These are what I call “the pain points of teleconferencing.” And they are solvable problems.

1. Set an agenda. Stick to it.

Unless the teleconference is between NFL owners, nobody gets to talk about the Super Bowl.

Before your next teleconference, send out an agenda to everyone. These are the items we will be discussing, and this is the order in which we’ll be discussing them. People are busy, and while your teleconference may in fact be the most important part of their work day, it is not the only part of their work day. Nothing kills a teleconference quicker than desultory talk about the weather, the latest flu outbreak or last night’s episode of Grey’s Anatomy. We all have other things to do today besides chit-chat right now. Stay on point, stick to the agenda, finish the call.

2. People are going to arrive late. Deal with it.

It’s just going to happen: people are going to show up late. They’ll have a million good reasons. We don’t need to hear them. We also don’t need to recap what’s been discussed already.

Think of it this way: somebody shows up late to Mass. The priest doesn’t stop the proceedings, introduce everyone, and then recap what’s happened so far. No. If you show up late, you check where in the liturgy (agenda) we are, listen in and catch up on your own.

There’s no reason a teleconference can’t operate that way either.

3. Use technology that works.

Teleconferencing technology should do the following:

— allow automatic sharing of documents during the call

— visual identification of who is speaking and participating

— late entrants can join without interrupting — or stopping — the call

If your teleconferencing system can’t do these things, your calls are going to be less effective, more painful for the callers, and, ultimately less collaborative.

We’re human beings. We’re social animals. We’re working on a problem together. Any technology you are using that disrupts collaborative work is anti-social and goes counter to who we are in our essence.

Thursday, December 20th, 2012 .

Just in time for Christmas. The brand new UberConference Android app has hit the Google Play store. We’ve created this and the brand new iPhone app with some great features.

First, the app finds the contacts already in your Android and adds them into your conference call for you.
You just click on the person’s name to add them to the call.

Notice you can add several of your contacts to the call at once. You can also instantly dial out to everyone who should be on the conference call with you.

UberConference will dial all numbers associated with the person you select.

Make an Instant Conference Call
Creating calls is lightening fast! Just choose who you want to invite and click “Start a New UberConference”. That’s it! The system will automatically call participants to join the call right then. At the end of each call you’ll receive a summary with interesting stats.

Just Sign In or Sign Up
Signing in is super easy. If you have already signed up through the website you can just sign in with the same email and password (or your social media profile of choice) to the Android app. Signing up on the app is easy to do, too. Never used UberConference before? Just put in the email and password you want and then choose the social networks you’d like to connect with.

Connect Multiple Accounts Inside the App
UberConference is integrated with all of the major social networks. Just click on any participant on the call and bring up their information from Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+.


While on an UberConference call, you have access to an array of in-call controls. As the conference creator you can mute, hang up, block or “earmuff” selected participants at any time during the call. You can also start and stop call recordings.

Download now!


Friday, February 14th, 2014 .

You know how every so often you get roped into dealing with something that you really don’t want to be involved with?  I’m not talking something life-threatening like the Ebola Virus or listening to your uncle from Wisconsin lecture you about religion while you’re stuck in a car with him going to a funeral.

No, I’m talking about the modest little peeves of modern life, the ones that really get under your skin.

For instance, you’re sitting in the cafeteria at work, and a nice conversation is going on about the Academy Awards or the California drought or something interesting like that and then some wisenheimer in the group says this: “Hey, did you see that Justin Bieber got arrested?”

Oh, boy, here we go.  Next thing you know all ten of you are talking about Justin Bieber.  Including you.  You’re stuck.  Everyone has their views and all of a sudden you find yourself  saying you blame his father because you were reading on that he was there in the nightclub that night and also was involved in setting up blocking off the street so that Justin and his friend could have their idiotic drag race and then somebody says, ‘well, that’s not what I heard’ and then you have defend your sources on this topic and bam!  Fifteen minutes have gone by and it’s time to return to your desk.  As you sit down you realize that the fifteen minutes you spent talking about Justin Bieber makes your teeth hurt.

And don’t think you’re alone.  Look what happened to esteemed broadcast journalist Andrea Mitchell during a discussion the other day on the NSA.  There was breaking Justin Bieber news.  Look at the pain on her face.  It’s heartbreaking, and it’s happened to you, too.

This is roughly where I rank teleconference PINs: right up there with a group discussion of Justin Bieber.  They’re both just hellishly painful, unnecessarily pointless, and yet, somehow completely inescapable.

You’re part of a design team that has several remote participants (including you) and it’s time for the weekly teleconference.  You dial into the teleconference system and they give you a PIN number you have to use to participate.  The computer-generated voice rattles off twelve completely random digits.  You’re writing them down:

8-9-5-8-1-3… oh, man, your pen stopped working.

Try it again.

8-9-5-8-1-3-8-9… the woman at the desk next to you just got a delivery of a dozen roses from her new boyfriend and she is squealing with happiness.

All right, let’s give this one more try.

Okay, you write: 8-9-5-8-1-3-8-9-4-9-7-5

Whew.  Got it.  That only took six hours.

Time to key it into your phone.  8-9-5-8-1-… wait, is that a 3 or a 5 I wrote down?  Call back and get the PIN all over again.  Yes, it was a 3.

And on it goes.

That’s why UberConference doesn’t use PINs.  You go to the website, log in, find your conference and click.  Voila.  Everyone’s there, you can see who’s there, and you’re ready to go.  It’s beautiful.  This is gonna go great, you think to yourself.

And then the person running the conference call says: “Hey, everybody, welcome to the call.  Before we get started, did you see that Justin Bieber was arrested?”