Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014 .

Let us know how we can make UberConference a better product for you and your team.

In addition to providing great support, we’re now offering a way for you to directly impact the future of UberConference. Just go to our Zendesk portal and select Feature Requests. From there, please give us a detailed brief of what you’d like to see next. We’ll be sure to keep you in the loop.

We’re excited to see what ideas you have and how we can continue to innovate for your team.

Support Forum

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014 .

We created UberConference to make your day more enjoyable and productive. When we launched, we joined an ecosystem of other apps that had the same mission and since then we have seen other, new apps join us. We recently decided to make a series on this blog where we recommend some of our other favorite apps in Google’s Chrome Web Store. We hope that you enjoy and find it useful!

Any.DO-Logo-+-NameAny.do: If you use dozens of post-its or a sheet of paper or a word document to keep track of your to-do list, then Any.do is going to be a much needed breath of fresh air. The app, which has a sparse and intuitive interface, is available on iOS, Android and in the Chrome Web Store, so you can keep track of your to-dos wherever you are and they remain synced. You might also enjoy some of its other features:

  1. Drag & drop to plan your agenda
  2. Add reminders, so you never forget a thing
  3. Attach notes, or use them as sub-tasks
  4. Embedded Gmail features let you quickly turn emails into actions

asana

Asana: Asana’s tagline is “Move out of email and into Asana.” While our team hasn’t completely forsaken email, Asana has cut back heavily on the back and forth and has made it much easier to track where individual products stand. One of the greatest accomplishments of Asana is how much it cuts back on meetings and needless paperwork tracking progress of projects, freeing up more time for actual work! There is a premium plan for larger teams, but the service is free if your team has less than 15 members.

Evernote_Logo

Evernote: Evernote promises to help you remember everything. It does. With Evernote, all of your notes, web clips, files and images are made available on every device and computer you use. You can use Evernote to keep yourself on track or to collaborate with your team by sharing files, notes and links.

 

Let us know what you think!

Wednesday, January 9th, 2013 .

The big trend at this year’s CES is ‘mobile first’. The Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) says this is the largest app event in the world! And our newly released mobile apps for iOS and Android are a part of it.

Check us out on the Wall of Apps, right in front of the North Hall:

And a close up of our display:

This is Brian Page from Vice and he is awesome! He’s working with the Wall of Apps folks and also incredibly helpful demoing UberConference to folks who come asking about our conference call mobile app. What a guy!

Come find our team (or tweet us if you prefer) @UberConference to let us know you’ve been by.

Friday, August 22nd, 2014 .

Blog_WSJ_Header_Imagery_Final-04

Craig Walker appeared in the Wall Street Journal Accelerators blog today giving his opinion on the topic of net neutrality. The Accelerators is run with contributed content from mentors in the startup community discussing the challenges of creating new businesses.

About Craig Walker, CEO UberConference

Craig Walker has a broad background as an entrepreneur, venture capitalist, executive and corporate attorney. He co-founded  UberConference in 2012 with $18 million from Andreessen Horowitz and Google Ventures.

Craig’s career in telecommunications began in 2001 when he ran Dialpad Communications, which he sold to Yahoo! in 2005.  He then co-founded and ran GrandCentral Communications, which he sold to Google in July 2007. It became Google Voice.

Craig is a graduate of UC Berkeley (BA), Georgetown University (MBA) and Boalt Hall School of Law (JD). He was presented with the Georgetown Entrepreneurial Excellence Award as an Outstanding Alumni Entrepreneur in April 2014.

 

Friday, March 28th, 2014 .

Okay, here’s the scenario. An inventory planning session for the spring season. For a chain of gardening stores in the Midwest and West Coast. Twenty managers on the conference call.

The CEO starts off with a few introductory remarks and then this sound appears in the background:

Look, I think we can all agree it’s one of the great masterpieces of grunge rock from the early 1990s. We’re rockin the Neverland. Oh, wait. We’re not supposed to be rockin’ the Neverland.  We’re supposed to be discussing tulip bulb orders. Okay, someone says, who’s got Metallica on in their shop?

The call comes to a halt as everyone tries to figure out the source of the Metallica. Finally, the manager in Green Bay fesses up. He just noticed the high school kid he has loading fertilizer bags on the display rack next to his office is using Metallica to “pump me up for this job, dude.”

Okay, we’re back on track and talking about tulip bulb orders — until the conference call comes to a halt with what seems to be the sound of automatic gun fire and mixed with a yipping. The conference call stops and everyone checks in. Nope, no roving gunman. And yet it continues. Oh, wait. It’s Alison, the National Sales Manager at the office in Provo. She’s chasing her Maltese around the office in heels. She had to bring “Walter” into the office today because he has a vet appointment right after this call.

The noisy caller is a nagging problem in teleconferencing. It’s not the caller per se, but their environment from which they are calling. Look, I’m as big a fan of Metallica as any other right-thinking American, but not when it’s drowning out a group discussion during a business teleconference call. And many times the offending party has no control over the background noise: Is it Gary in Spokane’s fault that a homecoming parade for Joel E Ferris High School is going by the window at the same time as our conference call?

Probably not.

But does that mean the rest of us have to suffer?

No. Which is precisely why UberConference has a mute setting on each of your callers. Barking dogs, heels on hardwood, brass bands in parades, or an old-fashioned “Enter the Sandman” blast: all of these can be eliminated by simply muting the offending callers.

Then just message the person whom you’ve muted that there’s a problem on their end. (A polite way of saying: shut the window, take off the heels, let the parade pass, unplug the speakers, and so on). When they are ready, unmute them and return to the call. And all of it is discreetly handled.

Pretty cool, huh?