Monday, March 24th, 2014 .

UberConference_appstore

UberConference has been featured in the business section of the Apple App Store. Our brand new iOS app gives Apple users an easier, more effective way to stay connected while on-the-go. The app offers some of the great capabilities you can find on our web browser:

Instant Conferences: Choose participants, and they’ll be dialed to join your conference right away.
Conference Summaries: After your call, you’ll get a summary with all the details of the call.
Schedule Conferences: You can send invites for a scheduled conference, just like on the web.
Call Recording: You can record your calls and listen to MP3s of them later.
See the Conference: The conference page shows you who’s on the call and who’s talking.
Social Profiles: While on a call, see your participants’ LinkedIn profiles and more.

appstore-mobile

Friday, July 11th, 2014 .

lebron-topper

So LeBron is going home to Cleveland. Or should he have said he’s going home to the 216, (which is the area code for Cleveland).

It’s about time that we begin to acknowledge that area codes have become as important a part of our identity as what NFL team’s bumper sticker we have on our second beater car. (I mean, come on, you’re not putting a bumper sticker on the nice car you driving to your cousin’s wedding in.)

In fact, with cell phones now, people hold onto their phone numbers long after they have left the place.  My oldest daughter, who went to college and worked in the San Francisco area for ten years, moved to Brooklyn four and a half years ago.  Her cell number still starts with 415, the coveted area code for San Francisco.

Why not give it up? Why not just get a New York area code?  Well, because, I believe, the area code has become a part of our identity in this era. Oh, someone says to her in New York City after she gives them her number, what area code is that?  San Francisco, she says. They’ll smile. So you’re from San Francisco? Yup, she says and smiles back.  Suddenly you know a lot more about that person than a hundred questions on a dating site will ever reveal.  It means my home is elsewhere.  This is where I live now, but I’m really from the 415.  It’s who I am.

So maybe LeBron going home to Cleveland also is about reclaiming the 216 as the authentic area code of his soul.

Tuesday, June 10th, 2014 .

appslogohd

We are excited to announce that we are one of the first Google Apps Premier Technology Partners. This builds upon our existing integrations with document sharing in Google Drive, integrating video conferencing through Google Hangouts, and in-browser calls through Google Chrome. The program will offer our team additional product, technical, marketing, sales, program, relationship, and support benefits to bring UberConference to more people.

 

Our team is excited to build even more integrated solutions with Google Apps services. Our customer base has been integral in utilizing the tools we have built to work seamlessly with Google Apps. The Weather Company uses our Google Drive integration daily. Ferrazzi Greenlight saves 15 minutes every meeting by driving more productive calls through Google Hangouts. The Chrome and Gmail integrations make it easy for AdRoll advertisers to click on any email or phone number and initiate a conference call.
We are looking forward to offering new product features in the Google Apps Marketplace and continuing to work with Google to bring richer solutions to more users everywhere.

Friday, February 14th, 2014 .

You know how every so often you get roped into dealing with something that you really don’t want to be involved with?  I’m not talking something life-threatening like the Ebola Virus or listening to your uncle from Wisconsin lecture you about religion while you’re stuck in a car with him going to a funeral.

No, I’m talking about the modest little peeves of modern life, the ones that really get under your skin.

For instance, you’re sitting in the cafeteria at work, and a nice conversation is going on about the Academy Awards or the California drought or something interesting like that and then some wisenheimer in the group says this: “Hey, did you see that Justin Bieber got arrested?”

Oh, boy, here we go.  Next thing you know all ten of you are talking about Justin Bieber.  Including you.  You’re stuck.  Everyone has their views and all of a sudden you find yourself  saying you blame his father because you were reading on TMZ.com that he was there in the nightclub that night and also was involved in setting up blocking off the street so that Justin and his friend could have their idiotic drag race and then somebody says, ‘well, that’s not what I heard’ and then you have defend your sources on this topic and bam!  Fifteen minutes have gone by and it’s time to return to your desk.  As you sit down you realize that the fifteen minutes you spent talking about Justin Bieber makes your teeth hurt.

And don’t think you’re alone.  Look what happened to esteemed broadcast journalist Andrea Mitchell during a discussion the other day on the NSA.  There was breaking Justin Bieber news.  Look at the pain on her face.  It’s heartbreaking, and it’s happened to you, too.

This is roughly where I rank teleconference PINs: right up there with a group discussion of Justin Bieber.  They’re both just hellishly painful, unnecessarily pointless, and yet, somehow completely inescapable.

You’re part of a design team that has several remote participants (including you) and it’s time for the weekly teleconference.  You dial into the teleconference system and they give you a PIN number you have to use to participate.  The computer-generated voice rattles off twelve completely random digits.  You’re writing them down:

8-9-5-8-1-3… oh, man, your pen stopped working.

Try it again.

8-9-5-8-1-3-8-9… the woman at the desk next to you just got a delivery of a dozen roses from her new boyfriend and she is squealing with happiness.

All right, let’s give this one more try.

Okay, you write: 8-9-5-8-1-3-8-9-4-9-7-5

Whew.  Got it.  That only took six hours.

Time to key it into your phone.  8-9-5-8-1-… wait, is that a 3 or a 5 I wrote down?  Call back and get the PIN all over again.  Yes, it was a 3.

And on it goes.

That’s why UberConference doesn’t use PINs.  You go to the website, log in, find your conference and click.  Voila.  Everyone’s there, you can see who’s there, and you’re ready to go.  It’s beautiful.  This is gonna go great, you think to yourself.

And then the person running the conference call says: “Hey, everybody, welcome to the call.  Before we get started, did you see that Justin Bieber was arrested?”

ARRRGGHH.