Thursday, March 20th, 2014 .

UberConference is proud to deliver a brand new way to connect. Everything you love about UberConference 2.0 is now available on your iPhone®. The app for iPhone features all of the great new tools available on desktop and Android in a complete toolkit.

Enjoy no PINs if you’re hosting the call and, in Pro, eliminate them altogether for every caller. The Apple interface has a brand new design that makes it easier than ever to organize your calls on the go. New security features allow you to also lock calls from your phone (once all your participants are in) by pressing ## on your phone. Our trial-mode has no sign-up and basic service is always free. Simplify your mobile experience.

Apple fans REJOICE!

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Thursday, September 20th, 2012 .

Last week it was great being back at TechCrunch Disrupt, this time in San Francisco. We met a lot of great folks, talked more about our newÜberConference Pro service, and got back on stage as the previous winners to give an update on ÜberConference and pass on the Disrupt Cup to the new champs, YourMechanic.TechCrunch TV was on hand for an in depth interview to dig into everything to do with UberConference, which we hope to see soon, and here is another video of us returning the trophy.

All in all it was a great event and we really enjoyed being back part of it. The startup world is alive and well and we had a great time hanging with all the great companies there. Thanks to everyone that stopped by the booth, and congrats again to Chenyu for winning our iPhone 5 giveaway.

Here are some shots from the event:

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013 .

imageDo you have international conference calls? Now people from all over the world can dial into your conferences with their phones.

Today, we’re happy to announce conference call international access numbers in over 40 countries across Europe, Asia and South America. Participants in ÜberConference calls can use these in-country local numbers to avoid expensive international calling rates when calling a US conference number. Additional country codes will be added in February.

We recently launched a feature that lets participants join an ÜberConference from their computer from anywhere in the world. Now people can also easily dial in from their phone with our international access numbers. After dialing the access number, they just punch in the conference call number, then PIN, and get connected.

This new international access number feature is available and included automatically at no extra charge for all ÜberConference Pro and Business accounts.  ÜberConference Free accounts can upgrade to Pro for just $10 a month to get a local number ($20 for toll free) and several other premium features such as larger conference sizes, recurring conferences, outbound dialing and more.

Check out the full list of countries with international access numbers, and our FAQs if you have questions on how they work.

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014 .

“Man is by nature a social animal; an individual who is unsocial naturally and not accidentally is either beneath our notice or more than human. Society is something that precedes the individual. Anyone who either cannot lead the common life or is so self-sufficient as not to need to, and therefore does not partake of society, is either a beast or a god. ” –Aristotle, “The Politics”

When you sit down and think about it, many of the greatest accomplishments of the human race are collaborative efforts. The cathedrals of medieval France. MGM musicals like “Singing in the Rain” or “Royal Wedding”. Democracy. The Renaissance. A double double cheeseburger with fries from In ‘N Out Burger.

These are things that could only have been created by a group effort – human beings working together.

Why?  Because we are, as Aristotle observed more than 2,300 years ago, social animals. We live a common life together.

So if we live a common life together and are, at heart, social animals; why do so many teleconferences not work? What, exactly, causes them to be disappointing? I think I can confidently state that it is not because we are either beasts nor gods.

What causes many teleconferences to fail is a combination of inefficient technology and basic human politeness. These are what I call “the pain points of teleconferencing.” And they are solvable problems.

1. Set an agenda. Stick to it.

Unless the teleconference is between NFL owners, nobody gets to talk about the Super Bowl.

Before your next teleconference, send out an agenda to everyone. These are the items we will be discussing, and this is the order in which we’ll be discussing them. People are busy, and while your teleconference may in fact be the most important part of their work day, it is not the only part of their work day. Nothing kills a teleconference quicker than desultory talk about the weather, the latest flu outbreak or last night’s episode of Grey’s Anatomy. We all have other things to do today besides chit-chat right now. Stay on point, stick to the agenda, finish the call.

2. People are going to arrive late. Deal with it.

It’s just going to happen: people are going to show up late. They’ll have a million good reasons. We don’t need to hear them. We also don’t need to recap what’s been discussed already.

Think of it this way: somebody shows up late to Mass. The priest doesn’t stop the proceedings, introduce everyone, and then recap what’s happened so far. No. If you show up late, you check where in the liturgy (agenda) we are, listen in and catch up on your own.

There’s no reason a teleconference can’t operate that way either.

3. Use technology that works.

Teleconferencing technology should do the following:

— allow automatic sharing of documents during the call

— visual identification of who is speaking and participating

— late entrants can join without interrupting — or stopping — the call

If your teleconferencing system can’t do these things, your calls are going to be less effective, more painful for the callers, and, ultimately less collaborative.

We’re human beings. We’re social animals. We’re working on a problem together. Any technology you are using that disrupts collaborative work is anti-social and goes counter to who we are in our essence.