Thursday, March 12th, 2015 .

Back in October, Firespotter Labs became Switch Communications, and we launched our second voice product, Switch—the cloud-based phone system for Google Apps users.

With a team deeply-rooted in telecommunications (our CEO Craig Walker founded both Google Voice and Yahoo! Voice), we launched Switch Communications to get back to what we love doing: building scalable voice products for the the modern worker.

Starting today, we’re moving our UberConference content over to the Switch Communications blog. Don’t worry, UberConference isn’t going anywhere, we just think it makes sense to talk about Switch and UberConference together as two amazing unified communications products that help us better connect when and where we work best.

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We look forward to sharing more awesome updates— from customer stories, product news, and helpful tips on how to make the most of Switch and UberConference.

Head on over and check out our first UberConference post about our customer, Mapbox.

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012 .

Things are really rolling here at UberConference. And now it seems we’ve made it to the finals for the Cloud Awards!

In case you didn’t know, the Cloud Awards identify and celebrate excellence in the field of cloud computing, with categories including Best Cloud Infrastructure, Data Innovation of the Year, Developer of the Year, Most Promising Startup (that’s what we’re up for), Web Services Excellence and Best Software as a Service.

Cloud Awards organizer Larry Johnson has said, “The standard of entries this year was truly incredible – Efficiency, agility and an ability to leverage all of the positive attributes of cloud technologies are what set the organizations in this shortlist apart from any other.”

UberConference is at the forefront of key trends that are changing the way people communicate in business. In searching for solutions that are simple, flexible, and cost effective, businesses are moving their telephony services to the cloud as supporting technologies evolve and solutions become more stable.

Wednesday, December 12th, 2012 .

Productivity consultant and founder of Custom Living Solutions, Joshua Zerkel, is also the SF ambassador for Evernote. Let’s just crown him the guy who really knows what he’s talking about when it comes to organizing data and being super efficient at anything to do with sharing in the cloud. Our Social Media Manager, Sarah Buhr, sat down to ask him a few of his great secrets for getting sh*% done.

Tips:

  1. Integrate UberConference with Evernote – When you integrate UberConference with Evernote, you have the option of sending any recorded call and notes to their Evernote account. Very helpful for journalists and writers or anyone who needs to save their conversations for later. Integrate with Evernote here.
  2. Utilize the Cloud – Think about how your data follows you around. Evernote allows you to keep all your files and other data in one central place so you can work from anywhere.
  3. Label your Evernote folders by topic and client to stay organized – You can collaborate with specific people easier if you separate everything out first.
  4. You can actually email notes into Evernote – Secret tip from Josh is that every Evernote user actually gets their own Evernote email. Go into your account settings to see it. Then if you use the @ in the subject line you can specify which notebook you want that info to go to. You can also use the # symbol to tag whatever you want it to follow as well.  Use this for receipts, events, really anything that goes into your email.

Links mentioned in the podcast:

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014 .

The Cloud Awards have officially announced UberConference as the winner of Most Promising Start-Up 2014.

Cloud Awards organizer Larry Johnson said: “The standard of entries in this year’s cloud computing awards was not just high. It was in the stratosphere, with astronomical competition. We are extremely pleased to endorse UberConference as a cloud services provider disrupting business models and leveraging cloud technologies.”

Congratulations to all other winners and nominees. We are extremely proud to win Most Promising Start-Up and on behalf of UberConference, we are excited to innovate in the year ahead.

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013 .

So, what is Web Real Time Communication (WebRTC), anyway? The idea isn’t new but people who use voice and video conferencing are beginning to hear it every day. At UberConference we use it to make it easy to join conference calls over the Internet from anywhere.

WebRTC allows real-time voice, video, and data to stream between two people using a web browser. There’s no need for plugins or third-party software, only the latest Chrome or Firefox.

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Until recently, web browsers were where you did pretty much everything except conferencing – web surfing, email, watching videos. However, the biggest disadvantage of the web browser was that it was lousy at two-way voice and video calls.

That kind of real-time communication had been challenging for companies for many years because the voice and video compression-decompression algorithms (called codecs) were really expensive. Only a few companies owned them, and they charged pricey licensing fees. In addition, browsers could only request data or send it upon request, not send and receive it in real time, as video chat requires.

To understand this, consider that browsers have been evolving ever since their creation to allow us to do more and more on the web. Plugins were introduced in the mid-late ’90s, which allowed developers to play videos with flash, facilitating a move toward the beginning of video communication. Then, in 2004, the browser language HTML5 developed the <audio> and <video> tags to allow this multimedia content to live in your browser without the need of a plugin. However, real time communication (RTC) remained a challenge because browsers lacked a method to send and receive data in real time, and often the stumbling block were the expensive codecs used to interpret the media communications between users.

For WebRTC to be truly effective, everyone needed access to the high quality codecs. In 2010 Google took on the challenge and purchased two companies: GIPS and On2. This turned the VoIP market on its head.

Here’s why: GIPS was a leading provider of VoIP codecs, On2 had a video codec that rivaled the H.26 standard. And Google open sourced them both, giving the RTC industry a giant push forward.

To solve the media transmission problem, the WebRTC collation created a set of open protocols for browsers to expose to developers. As browsers adopt this standard and implement them, developers can quickly write RTC applications with a few lines of JavaScript code.

That’s why WebRTC has been a big deal for UberConference and for all Internet users. It lets them conference in real-time without having to mess around with applications or phones or leave their web browser.

This is a huge benefit for emerging companies, who, ten years ago, would have paid significantly higher costs for  hardware and services to set everything up. They can now build their companies with a much lighter – and cheaper- footprint. Now that’s something to call your CEO about.