Wednesday, January 8th, 2014 .

The New Year brings out a time for nostalgia and innovation. As pioneers on the timeline of history, we continually look backward to create the ‘new’ going forward. Creativity (and some clever failures) have led from the railroad to the jetway, the cave dwelling to the cottage, and the telegraph to the telephone.

Ondi Timoner and the team at A Total Disruption published an article in the Huffington Post about our own disruptive path at UberConference in a high-level interview with CEO Craig Walker. As Ondi cites in the article, “It’s time we hop forward a few decades forward and do business better by embracing the disruptive innovation in this arena.”

We only get one opportunity to make the world a better place in one small way. Our hope this year is that UberConference continues to facilitate better team conversations and forge stronger bonds in your own area. Every minute spent speaking together as colleagues is valuable. Especially as the modern workplace scatters us across the globe, we hope we’re able to help you connect with your team more effectively. Happy New Year!

Friday, December 14th, 2012 .

Need someone to schedule conference calls on your behalf? Until now this was only possible by sharing your password with someone. We know that’s not something most people want to do. So we changed that.
Starting today, UberConference Pro users can delegate their account by creating an administrator password. This allows someone else to schedule and edit calls on your behalf.

To create an administrator password, just login to your account and go to Settings>Password then click on “Invite an administrator”.  Your chosen admin will get an email prompting them to create a password to access your account.  They will still login with your email address but have their own password.

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Once created, your admin will be able to do most anything you can with your account, other than change your password.  You can revoke these admin privileges at any time.

For questions about this and other Pro or Enterprise features contact sales@uberconference.com

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013 .

We’re pretty big fans of mobile here at Firespotter  – so far we’ve released 4 mobile apps in the last 18 months. So, when a great mobile conference like the sold-out D:Dive Into Mobile comes up, we had to be there. Where else can you get a line on where mobile technologies are going and hear from all of the movers and shakers in mobile in a jam-packed 2 days?

Hosted by Bay Area journalists Ina Fried and Liz Gannes, in collaboration with Kara Swisher and Walt Mossberg, D: Dive Into Mobile gave a bird’s-eye view of many of the emergent issues in the mobile space. Here are five big ones that stood out at the conference.

  • Facebook’s new CTO  Mike Schroepfer spoke to Facebook’s biggest mobile challenge –  following the migration of his company’s billion-plus users from the Web to mobile.
  • Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt gave the low-down  Google’s wide-ranging mobile efforts – from Android to Chrome, Admob to YouTube. In a separate talk, Google’s Jason Spero and Millennial Media’s Mollie Spilman went over the importance of tracking user behavior for mobile ads. Spero noted that mobile refers more to a specific context, rather than a use case.
  • Waze CEO Noam Bardin talked about his company’s subtle advantage over Google – they’ve got 44 million users and 70,000 volunteer map editors. So far, they’ve validated a billion and a half kilometers (about 932 million miles) of roads. Note: One of Craig’s favorite apps!
  • Intel’s Mike Bell and Microsoft’s Terry Myerson  – two brands not known for robust mobile  presence –  gave separate talks to argue why their company shouldn’t be counted out in the transition to the golden age of mobile strategies.
  • Movile CEO Fabricio Bloisi Rocha explained how the lower penetration of smartphones into Latin America market will be turned around in coming years by an increase Wi-Fi connections and cheaper prices.

Thanks again to D: All Things Digital founders Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher for hosting such an awesome conference. To stay on top of all of their mobile coverage, go here, and here’s the coverage of the entire conference.

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Spencer Ante, Andrea Roesch, Craig Walker

Friday, March 28th, 2014 .

Okay, here’s the scenario. An inventory planning session for the spring season. For a chain of gardening stores in the Midwest and West Coast. Twenty managers on the conference call.

The CEO starts off with a few introductory remarks and then this sound appears in the background:

Look, I think we can all agree it’s one of the great masterpieces of grunge rock from the early 1990s. We’re rockin the Neverland. Oh, wait. We’re not supposed to be rockin’ the Neverland.  We’re supposed to be discussing tulip bulb orders. Okay, someone says, who’s got Metallica on in their shop?

The call comes to a halt as everyone tries to figure out the source of the Metallica. Finally, the manager in Green Bay fesses up. He just noticed the high school kid he has loading fertilizer bags on the display rack next to his office is using Metallica to “pump me up for this job, dude.”

Okay, we’re back on track and talking about tulip bulb orders — until the conference call comes to a halt with what seems to be the sound of automatic gun fire and mixed with a yipping. The conference call stops and everyone checks in. Nope, no roving gunman. And yet it continues. Oh, wait. It’s Alison, the National Sales Manager at the office in Provo. She’s chasing her Maltese around the office in heels. She had to bring “Walter” into the office today because he has a vet appointment right after this call.

The noisy caller is a nagging problem in teleconferencing. It’s not the caller per se, but their environment from which they are calling. Look, I’m as big a fan of Metallica as any other right-thinking American, but not when it’s drowning out a group discussion during a business teleconference call. And many times the offending party has no control over the background noise: Is it Gary in Spokane’s fault that a homecoming parade for Joel E Ferris High School is going by the window at the same time as our conference call?

Probably not.

But does that mean the rest of us have to suffer?

No. Which is precisely why UberConference has a mute setting on each of your callers. Barking dogs, heels on hardwood, brass bands in parades, or an old-fashioned “Enter the Sandman” blast: all of these can be eliminated by simply muting the offending callers.

Then just message the person whom you’ve muted that there’s a problem on their end. (A polite way of saying: shut the window, take off the heels, let the parade pass, unplug the speakers, and so on). When they are ready, unmute them and return to the call. And all of it is discreetly handled.

Pretty cool, huh?

Monday, March 3rd, 2014 .

unnamedLinda Beltran is UberConference’s very own Customer Support Representative. She is an asset to our entire company and her spunk and personality is legendary to our customers and team. Last week, Linda posted a video of her son (also a big personality) and it went viral.

 

Q: Please introduce yourself to the UberConference blogosphere.

 A. My name is Linda and I am the mother of 3-year-old Matthew and his little brother Kevin (aka PaPas).

Q: You posted a video last week that’s gone a little viral. Tell us about it.

A. Like all my other videos, I initially posted this one to share with friends and family. Well, they happened to share it, and the people they shared it with shared it, and so on.  I’ve always said Mateo is an old soul. The kid definitely keeps us on our toes, and this video depicts him, well, accurately.

If Mateo feels the need and has a valid argument, he will be sure to voice it. He felt he didn’t need to eat dinner since he already had lunch, and that cupcakes were a suitable compromise.

Q: Mateo wanted a cupcake? Throw down the scenario.

A. On this particular night, I went to Gramma’s house to pick him up. Gramma told me he didn’t want to eat his dinner. I let Matthew know that we would not be having a fun night unless he ate his dinner. He found some hidden cupcakes and was on a mission to have them. After a back-and-forth of “Mommy pleassseee can I have them?” and me telling him not until he had dinner, he decided to wait until I wasn’t paying attention to use those cute eyes of his on Gramma, which was not-so-secretly hilarious.

Mommy’s spidey-sense kicked in, I grabbed my phone and thought, “Let’s see where this goes.” Gramma and I had to keep a straight face. The end result was the video. He was unaware the camera was on as I was pretending to ignore him and be busy with the phone.

Q: Why does Mateo call you Linda?

A. This summer we went on a family trip to a theme park.  We came across a lost boy, who could not for the life of him tell us his name or parents’ names. We felt horrible, and as we handed him over to park staff we realized we’d never really told our boys what our names were–they only knew us as Mommy and Daddy. We didn’t want them to ever be in the same situation and not know our names, so we taught them, and they quickly learned. This made Mateo feel a little empowered.

For the most part we are still Mommy and Daddy,  but when he is serious and wants to make sure we are paying attention, we quickly become Linda and Kenneth.

 Q: When is Mateo going to visit the UberConference office?

A. Funny you mention that. Since the video has been out, we’ve been asked by numerous friends and family members if he can stop by their offices, as requested by co-workers who saw the video. They even offered to bake him cupcakes.

Let me check his busy schedule and I will get back to you on that!

Q: If  Mateo was going to be on a conference call, who would it be with?

A. If it were up to mom, Ellen DeGeneres. If we ask Mateo, he could have a pretty serious conversation with Batman, Spiderman AND Superman. Wait, I can’t forget Ironman and the guy with the ice that goes sswwooossshhh. That would be good.

Mateo is quite a tough cookie.

He is, but I want everyone to know that he isn’t disrespectful. In an effort to raise independent young adults, we let our children have a voice. I’m a new parent and I’m learning as much from my kids as they are learning from me. The arguing started way before Mateo could talk–he would let us know he didn’t like certain shoes or clothes with his baby blabber. I love seeing a little more of their personalities as they grow. Mateo has his own spunk and is becoming his own little person. I love that about him. The boys know when mom is serious and when they can engage in some healthy debate. In an effort to raise my kids with a voice, I pick my battles and sometimes let them feel like they’ve won…or at least give them the chance to try. 🙂