Wednesday, April 16th, 2014 .

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You asked for it, and we delivered. We are pleased to announce a fantastic new addition to our suite of productivity applications with screen sharing. Our award-winning teleconferencing service now supports real-time collaboration with screen sharing. (In addition to recent integrations with Google Hangouts, Google Doc add-ons, and in-conference document sharing.)

Facilitating a screen share is as easy as clicking the “Share Your Screen” button in the bottom left corner of the UberConference dashboard in Google Chrome. Presenters without the UberConference extension will be prompted to install it the first time they screen share, also having the option to share their full screen or a specific tab. Viewers will automatically be able to see the presenter’s screen view on their own screens using any browser.

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012 .

He’s a game changer and an innovator…and all over the place. Ben Huh, the guy behind LOL catsand many other internet crazes is a busy man. He says he takes at least 2 or 3 conference calls a day…and hates them! Major downer for a guy having so much fun at work. We discussed what’s wrong with the current tech and how apps like ours at UberConference (and a few others) are changing that.

Links mentioned in the podcast:

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014 .

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UberConference is excited to accept TMC’s 2014 Internet Telephony Excellence Award. This is the third year UberConference has won this award and we are honored to be recognized as an innovator in the telephony industry. The award came after a successful week at the ITEXPO West event where our CEO, Craig Walker, was a featured guest on the OTT and UC: The Future of the Telephone Number panel.

Walker also had the opportunity to sit down with Erik Linask, the Group Editorial Director of TMC to discuss UberConference’s role in disrupting the traditional conferencing space. “The funny thing is the things that are frustrating to users haven’t changed in 30 years. It’s dialing some ridiculous access code to get into your call and not knowing who’s in the room when you’re on the call,” said Walker.

“A lot of conference call providers used to give you a wallet card to remember their features. The truth is nobody used these features because nobody remembered to pull out the card. At UberConference, we wanted to change all that. No PINs. No access codes. You just dial a number and you’re on the call. We give you a web address where you can see who’s on the call.”

Another important topic of discussion was catering to the remote workforce with more robust telephony tools. UberConference’s audio heavy interface addresses that challenge with great ease. “Even though conference calling has been around forever, 80% of conference minutes are audio only. If you’re going to have more and more remote people doing it, it’s got to be easier for the remote worker.”

Thursday, August 23rd, 2012 .

Conference calls usually are a pain. One of the things I hate the most is having to enter a long PIN followed by a pound sign to join a call. It’s nearly impossible when you’re driving or dialing in from your mobile phone to go back and forth from your email or calendar app to the phone dialer to enter them. They’re painful, and we think there’s a better way.

With ÜberConference we have a “no PIN” solution. When you create your ÜberConference account, you enter all the phone numbers you might be dialing in from (home, cell, office, etc.). The only time you’ll ever need to enter a PIN to join one of your conferences is if you dial in from any number other than the ones on your profile. This is great for you, but what about the other callers? Basically, we treat all the other callers the same way. If you invite somebody to a conference call, they’ll need no PIN and will be automatically added so long as they dial in from a number that you have for them in your address book. This is a great reason to sign in with your Google account or to upload your address book once you’ve joined ÜberConference (it makes it easy for us to identify your callers based on their caller ID).

Of course some people love entering PINs…otherwise why would they put up with it? I was invited to a conference call through another provider today, and I kid you not, there was a 9 digit PIN to get into the conference…and it was shared with everybody on the call. Were there really 900 million other calls going on at that time that would force me to use a 9 digit PIN? C’mon!

Since we hate PINs so much, you may be asking why we provide them to our users…good question. First, you will need it if you call in from some unknown number to keep your conference secure. Second, you may not know everyone needed for the call, so PINs can be shared with people not invited directly. Hopefully after that first amazing UberConference though, everybody will sign up for their own account and not ever need a PIN again 🙂

We’re working on some other features to make joining calls even easier. Soon you’ll be able to have UberConference dial out to all the people you want on the call at the time of your call. All they’ll have to do is answer the call and press 1 to join the UberConference. Sweet, right?

If you have any other suggestions or thoughts, feel free to shoot us a note at ideas@uberconference.com and we’ll be sure to think about them.

Thursday, November 29th, 2012 .

How to Get Your Whole Company Hooked on Social with Michael Brito

SVP of Social Business for Edelman, Michael Brito, is a social media rockstar with over 30k Twitter followers and a book currently out on Amazon Smart Business Social Business. He’s one of the main forces behind social for companies like Hewlett Packard and Intel, and one of the foremost experts in the country when it comes to B2B social media marketing. Host of our Ubercast, Sarah Buhr, sat down to chat with Michael at the Edelman offices in downtown San Francisco about some key ways to get everyone you work with on board with the social program.

Tips:

  • Get engineers and others in the company involved. Ask them to write a blog post and actively talk about their expertise.
  • Create a social media employee guide to help those in the company understand messaging and social media etiquette
  • Encourage employees to actively tweet out and post company messaging on their own social channels.

Links mentioned in the podcast:

Amazon

Hewlett Packard

Intel