Tuesday, October 14th, 2014 .

We do our best to listen to feedback from our customers, and we’ve been hearing quite a few requests to give UberConference organizers the ability to choose who receives the summary emails sent after each conference call.

We originally implemented this feature to give meetings more context. The summary emails contain links to any shared documents or recordings, correlating with meeting notes for reference. They also include interesting stats, like who was there and who talked the most and the least.

If UberConference Pro and Business organizers would rather not have the email summaries sent to every participant after the conference ends, they now have the ability to manage that in their settings.

To specify who should receive the conference summaries, go to uberconference.com/settings (when logged in), and scroll all the way down to the “Notification Preferences” section. Under “Call Summary,” you will see the option to disable or enable the conference call summary for participants or for yourself. Don’t forget to click on the “Save Changes” button on the bottom of the page.

 

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We’re continuously trying to make Business features more robust for our customers, and disabling call summary emails is just one of the many ways you can customize your conference calls with UberConference Business. Business users also get advanced features like custom hold music, up to 100 callers, dial out to add guests to call, local conference phone numbers, and more.

UberConference Free users still maintain control over the summary emails for themselves.

Follow us on Twitter to stay in the loop on all things UberConference! @uberconference

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013 .

So, what is Web Real Time Communication (WebRTC), anyway? The idea isn’t new but people who use voice and video conferencing are beginning to hear it every day. At UberConference we use it to make it easy to join conference calls over the Internet from anywhere.

WebRTC allows real-time voice, video, and data to stream between two people using a web browser. There’s no need for plugins or third-party software, only the latest Chrome or Firefox.

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Until recently, web browsers were where you did pretty much everything except conferencing – web surfing, email, watching videos. However, the biggest disadvantage of the web browser was that it was lousy at two-way voice and video calls.

That kind of real-time communication had been challenging for companies for many years because the voice and video compression-decompression algorithms (called codecs) were really expensive. Only a few companies owned them, and they charged pricey licensing fees. In addition, browsers could only request data or send it upon request, not send and receive it in real time, as video chat requires.

To understand this, consider that browsers have been evolving ever since their creation to allow us to do more and more on the web. Plugins were introduced in the mid-late ’90s, which allowed developers to play videos with flash, facilitating a move toward the beginning of video communication. Then, in 2004, the browser language HTML5 developed the <audio> and <video> tags to allow this multimedia content to live in your browser without the need of a plugin. However, real time communication (RTC) remained a challenge because browsers lacked a method to send and receive data in real time, and often the stumbling block were the expensive codecs used to interpret the media communications between users.

For WebRTC to be truly effective, everyone needed access to the high quality codecs. In 2010 Google took on the challenge and purchased two companies: GIPS and On2. This turned the VoIP market on its head.

Here’s why: GIPS was a leading provider of VoIP codecs, On2 had a video codec that rivaled the H.26 standard. And Google open sourced them both, giving the RTC industry a giant push forward.

To solve the media transmission problem, the WebRTC collation created a set of open protocols for browsers to expose to developers. As browsers adopt this standard and implement them, developers can quickly write RTC applications with a few lines of JavaScript code.

That’s why WebRTC has been a big deal for UberConference and for all Internet users. It lets them conference in real-time without having to mess around with applications or phones or leave their web browser.

This is a huge benefit for emerging companies, who, ten years ago, would have paid significantly higher costs for  hardware and services to set everything up. They can now build their companies with a much lighter – and cheaper- footprint. Now that’s something to call your CEO about.

Tuesday, December 10th, 2013 .

UberConference is proud to deliver a brand new app for Android with the launch of Version 2.0! We’ve added new features to make your meetings more productive than ever. Best of all, our Android app has no PINs if you’re hosting the call, and in our Pro upgrade, there are no PINs for anyone in your conference. Clear and simple. Start a call from your mobile device with no hassle.The Android interface has an all-new design. Open the app, and you’re already in your Conference Room. Your phone contacts are synced to make starting and scheduling calls simple.Our trial-mode has no sign-up and basic service is always free. Simplify your mobile experience now with the Android app for UberConference.

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Tuesday, February 4th, 2014 .

Since we are showcasing our product at LegalTech in New York this week (Booth #2507), we decided to put together a list of our top legal features.

Teleconferencing is one of the single most important aspects of your profession. When we were designing and building the UberConference teleconferencing system, we included a series of features that are specifically useful and valuable for attorneys. These features address issues that often uniquely apply to legal teleconferences.

1. You know who is on the call.
UberConference allows you to see who, exactly, is on this call. We’re not a video conferencing system, but each participant is identified on the screen while the call is going on. These are private, important issues you’re dealing with. You need to know who is on the call, and whether they belong there. All too often confidential calls are interrupted by an audible ‘beep’ followed by, “Who’s there?” only to be met with silence. UberConference provides full transparency and ensures every caller on the line is allowed to listen and participate.

2. You know exactly how long the call lasted.
You’ve set up a 30-minute teleconference on your calendar for a Monday. Guess what? It ended up lasting three hours. That’s fine. Fair enough. It needed to go that long. With UberConference call tracking, you have a record of how long the call actually lasted no matter which phone you used to dial into the call. Lots of firms have ways to track hours on conference calls, but those solutions are limited to your desk phone or require you to enter a useless PIN number for each call. Only UberConference does this automatically every time. That information is invaluable, especially if the client’s calendar only shows a 30-minute call on their schedule from that day. UberConference provides the proof you need to justify your billing, no questions asked.

3. You can “lock” the call.
Once you’ve started an UberConference, we show you every person who has dialed into your call. There is never the possibility of somebody lurking on the line and just listening to your privileged conversion. With UberConference, we let you lock in (and more importantly — lock out) participants. This locking feature keeps callers from slipping into a call who do not belong there. Once you have the right people on the call, just hit the lock icon (or press ** from your phone) and nobody else can join your conversation.

Monday, March 18th, 2013 .

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We are happy to announce that UberConference is one of the four startups chosen to present by Enterprise Connect at its Innovation Showcase. Enterprise Connect is the leading conference and exposition on enterprise communications and collaboration and is taking place in Orlando, Florida March 18-21, 2013. UberConference provides those on a teleconference with a broad range of easy-to-use tools that increase the usefulness and productivity of a group call. UberConference will present at Innovation Showcase at 1 p.m. ET Monday, March 18 located in Osceola C.

Photo credit: Enterprise Connect/UBM

With its unique, visual interface, UberConference shows participants who’s on a call and who’s speaking at any given moment, provides document sharing through Box and Evernote, and gives all participants access to every other participant’s Google+, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook public social profiles. As one of the earliest adopters of the highly anticipated WebRTC standard, UberConference users can “dial into” UberConference calls directly from their Chrome browser. UberConference is also available for both iPhone and Android.

“UberConference delivers functionality and control through powerful yet easy-to-use tools that increase business productivity at significantly lower cost than conventional enterprise solutions,” said Craig Walker, CEO and co-founder of Firespotter Labs. “We are thrilled to be selected as one of the four startups to present at Enterprise Connect’s Innovation Showcase.”

Enterprise 2013 will focus on wireless, video, Unified Communications, WebRTC, SIP Trunking, and the Cloud. The Enterprise Connect Innovation Showcase is designed to feature innovative products and services from new and emerging start-up firms in these areas.